Keep in mind: this way of structuring this assignment is only a suggestion; it doesn't have to be exactly like that.  But hopefully this gives you an idea of what this kind of paper could look like. Sets Set 1: Nicholas Carr, “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”  Clive Thompson, “Smarter than You Think:  How Technology Is Changing Our Minds for the Better”  Set 2: Sherry Turkle, “No Need to Call” 

Note that those are five parts, not paragraphs (exceptions: the introduction and the conclusion are usually one paragraph each).  What could this look like?  Here’s an example:  After the brief introductory paragraph (where you introduce your topic, basic information about your authors with brief summaries of authors’ ideas, a sense of your argument and perhaps why your argument matters), you might have a summary of one author (1 paragraph), then a summary of the second author (1 paragraph).  Then you might have one paragraph that explains how they agree or disagree (though you can already allude to that in the summary paragraphs through phrases like “Unlike Turkle, Wortham asserts that…”).  Note that the paragraph that explains how the two authors agree or disagree is still “they say,” since you’re not yet putting forward your own opinion on the issues.  At that point you’ll have written about 2 pages.  Then you write your own argument (“I say”) in relation to what they say (about a page and a half).  At that point you’ve written about 3.5 pages.  Then you end with one short concluding paragraph, where you wrap it up with a return sentence and again explain why it matters.

Keep in mind: this way of structuring this assignment is only a suggestion; it doesn’t have to be exactly like that.  But hopefully this gives you an idea of what this kind of paper could look like.

Sets

Set 1: Nicholas Carr, “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”

Clive Thompson, “Smarter than You Think:  How Technology Is Changing Our Minds for the Better”

Set 2: Sherry Turkle, “No Need to Call”

Jenna Wortham, “I Had a Nice Time with You Tonight.  On the App.”

Set 3: Michaela Cullington, “Does Texting Affect Writing?”

Malcolm Gladwell, “Small Change: Why the Revolution Will Not Be Tweeted”

Grading Guide: I will use the following grading guide to grade your papers.  Think of it as a “cheat sheet,” but without the “cheating” part.  It’ll help you figure out how to get a good grade on MWP 2.

Introduction (10 points)

Includes basic information about the authors as well as the full titles of essays; includes a brief summary statement about essays; includes a clear thesis statement (summary of “I say” in relation to “They Say”).

“They say” inhabits world-view of each author (20 points)

Each summary does not agree or disagree with author (summary inhabits worldview of author); each summary uses sophisticated signal verbs to summarize author’s points; no listing of author’s points or “closest cliché” (pp. 31, 35, 33)

Quoting: Uses quotes correctly and appropriately (20 points)

Quotes used to present “proof of evidence” (p. 43) in summary of authors’ arguments — Quotes should not be “orphans” (p. 44) — Quotes should be framed appropriately (“quotation sandwich”) (p. 47) — Quotes should be Introduced with appropriate verb (p. 48) – Indicates page number of quote (p. 49)