Reflect of a patient who presented with a breast condition during your Practicum Experience. **Describe the patient′s personal medical history, drug therapy and treatments, and follow-up care. Then, explain your patient education strategies for patients with or at risk for breast conditions.

  • Type of paperAssignment
  • SubjectNursing
  • Number of pages1
  • Format of citationAPA
  • Number of cited resources3
  • Type of serviceWriting

Reflect of a patient who presented with a breast condition during your Practicum Experience. **Describe the patient′s personal medical history, drug therapy and treatments, and follow-up care. Then, explain your patient education strategies for patients with or at risk for breast conditions. Include a desсrіption of how you might teach patients to perform breast self-examinations. ** peer-reviewed articles no older than 5 years *** to include title and reference page **Example paper attached

Opportunities for improvement

Nursing is a continuous learning experience. It constantly evolves. From paper charting, now we have electronic charting, and from here, I’m quite sure we will see more interesting changes in the near future. EHR is really a marvelous technology, with the use of EHR, we can go back months, even years of patient history and we are able to compare from presentation or baseline even without having seen the patient first, we can pretty much formulate a good picture. My only comment about this is that human interaction is missing. My suggestion is that nurse informaticists should hold meetings probably, if feasible, at least every quarter, to check on the system’s strengths and weaknesses coming from the bedside nurses, the ones that use the technology day in and day out. I think, in that way, we, as bedside nurses at least can feel their palpable support. Additionally, nurse informaticists should work on possibly reducing redundancy in charting. The current EHR system we use at the organization I work for has so many redundant charting that I feel as though, it takes away from nurse to patient interaction. Moreover, honestly, I don’t even know the name of our organization’s nurse informaticists. Although I’m sure I can find it on the intranet and perhaps the one we see in the unit asking about any system issues is one of them, or maybe she is just another superuser, I honestly don’t know. I think we, as a people, are so in awe of new technology that we forget that human interaction is just as important.

References

Adams, E., Hussey, P., & Shaffer, F. A. (2015). Nursing informatics and leadership, an essential competency for a global priority: eHealth. Nurse Leader, 13(5), 52-57.

Glassman, K. S. (2017). Using data in nursing practice. American Nurse Today, 12(11), 45-47. Retrieved from: https://www.americannursetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ant11-Data-1030.pdf

Sipes, C. (2016). Project Management: Essential skill of nurse informaticists. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 255, 252-256.